All Boys Aren't Blue & Kapana

All Boys Aren't Blue & Kapana

In these one-of-a-kind films, expectations of Black masculinity are explored through a queer lens. From the U.S. to Namibia, the societal and cultural details differ, but common ground is found in the struggle to reconcile your true self with the version the outside world wants you to be.

All Boys Aren't Blue
Director: Nathan Hale Williams
2020 | USA | 40m | English
Actors Bernard David Jones, Dyllon Burnside, Thomas Hobson, and Jenifer Lewis bring to life the words of Black non-binary author George Matthew Johnson’s transparent and sparkling memoir, aided by director Nathan Hale Williams' visual poetry. Tackling issues of Black masculinity and Black queerness in relationship to Blackness, each character represents Johnson at different stages of their life, chronicling their story of growing up and challenging gender identity norms, as well as learning to adapt to HIV/AIDS.

Kapana
Director: Philippe Talavera
2020 | Namibia | 60m | English, Afrikaans, Oshiwambo
In the first gay love story out of Namibia, George, a middle class insurance broker, lives openly and with acceptance from his family, while his new boyfriend — working-class food vendor Simeon — remains in the closet, gnawed at by traditional notions of masculinity and the desire for acceptance from his peers. In a country where same-sex relationships are still criminalized, these two men begin a romance that challenges both of them to shed societal expectations and stigma to truly flourish.

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All Boys Aren't Blue & Kapana

4 Videos

  • All Boys Aren't Blue

    Actors Bernard David Jones, Dyllon Burnside, Thomas Hobson, and Jenifer Lewis bring to life the words of Black non-binary author George Matthew Johnson’s transparent and sparkling memoir, aided by director Nathan Hale Williams' visual poetry. Tackling issues of Black masculinity and Black queerne...

  • Q&A: All Boys Aren't Blue

  • Kapana

    In the first gay love story out of Namibia, George, a middle class insurance broker, lives openly and with acceptance from his family, while his new boyfriend — working-class food vendor Simeon — remains in the closet, gnawed at by traditional notions of masculinity and the desire for acceptance ...